Calm Days Before the “Storm”: 9/24 – 10/7

Confident paddler- and yes the board needs more air

Confident paddler- and yes the board needs more air

Oh give me a home where the paddle boards roam and the waters are calm all day; Where seldom is heard, “Oh crap I fell in”, and the SeaDoos don’t come out and play.

Yes, we know a place like that; Harness Creek off the South River next to Quiet Waters Park. We’d anchored there for nearly a week 5 years ago for weather and to get Ms. Ortolan’s screecher repaired after Russ lost the race with s/v Pride of Baltimore off New Jersey. 🙂

And first off a few good boat pics as we headed down the Bay.

Time to clean

Time to clean. Too messy and LOUD to do at the dock.

We keep out of the channel, which is for the big ships, but at one point just before I took this shot, it sure looked like we’d be meeting up head on. The day was overcast and not very pleasant so we were surprised to find lots of local boats anchored in Harness Creek.

Perspective- 600ft vs 27ft

Perspective- 600ft vs 27ft. Prometheus Leader – probably a car carrier, left a negligible wake. Good boy

Sunday was sorta warm and quiet pleasant so why not practice? In the top part of the photo you can see the yellow rental kayaks, (SUPs too) at the floating dock. It’s where you can leave your dinghy to walk through the park.

Looking good!!

Looking good!!

The resident blue heron kept me busy but I missed a good in-flight shot.dsc04099-800x584

Monday brought breezy and a chance of showers but we bravely walked through the park headed for lunch at Main Ingredient, another great dining spot only one mile away.

Deer show no fear as we walk through Quiet Waters Park

Deer show no fear as we walk through Quiet Waters Park

Because Main Ingredient also caters, the dessert offerings are extensive and from our booth I could hear them calling out to us. The Andes (Mint) chocolate multi-layer cake served us for two dinner desserts.  We share. 🙂

Lunch at Main Ingredient. Tempting desserts taunted us from our booth

Lunch at Main Ingredient. Tempting desserts taunted us from our booth

Next stop Solomons, where we’d re-connect with our friends Mike & Ann of Traveling Soul, now also owners of a beautiful condo unit. Spot was more active than we usually have seen her, as she’s got more leg room (even though Traveling Soul is a large Defever motoryacht) and an attentive audience.

Spot is mezmerized by the garbage disposal

Spot is fascinated by the garbage disposal, but you should have seen her with the Soda Stream!

Do you know you can grow more romaine lettuce from the ends?  Ann told me you just do like in the photo below and soon you will have more for your money. Nice uh?

The lettuce whisperer

The lettuce whisperer: growing more from the bottom hearts

We were invited not only for dinner and Vodka & Tonics made with Ann’s magical formula homemade tonic, but to do a load of laundry. I know some of you can’t imagine how great that was, but it was pretty special.

My best new laundry helper

My best new laundry helper

We got to spend three nights at Calvert Marina (same place as this past June), but they were booked for the weekend due to the upcoming Krogen Rendezvous and a Defever Rendezvous after that. Rain was the word, especially Wednesday which of course was errand day. Ann took me to shop and we both got some things off our lists.

After leaving the dock we moved less than 1/8 mile up Back Creek to anchor. The wind was still honkin’ in the Bay although we felt little all tucked in, and rain came and went through Saturday evening. During our Solomons stay the wind display function on our wireless weather station crapped out. I don’t think you will be surprised to learn that the one year warranty recently passed.

The last hurrah of a line of scattered heavy rain. Was so narrow you could see brightness beyond.

 

Behind the trees and tall flag pole is Mike & Ann's Solomons Landing condo

Behind the trees and tall flag pole is Mike & Ann’s Solomons Landing condo complex.

Early on during our Solomons stay we began reading about Tropical Storm / Hurricane Matthew. The models disagreed, the spaghetti strands fanned out like octopus tentacles and we devised several plans, each based on severity and guestimate location of the storm as it headed up this way.

Top Rack was a planned stop for diesel and dining but they’d kick us out if a hurricane warning was in effect, so we had to cancel. I mean did we want to just assume we could find room at a protected marina close by? Not many choices for those.

One option was to head way up the Potomac as far in as possible; either find an acceptable anchorage or protected marina with floating docks.

One suggested marina could only offer us the outside of a T head, so even though it was a floating dock we declined and kept calling.

Then I came across Sunset Boating Center in Hampton, VA. Up the Hampton River and down a dead end canal, it met all our criteria.

We arrived on Monday Oct 3, well ahead of the very slow moving hurricane. The NE Bay winds were forecast to pick up mid week so why endure a rough trip when we can avoid it?

Never visited Hampton before, so a few days of settled weather allowed us to explore by dinghy and by land.

Sunset Boating Center- no frills lots of protection. Before removing cushions and closing bimini top

Sunset Boating Center- no frills lots of protection. Before removing cushions and closing bimini top

Over by the side street entrance sits the Barking Dog where we ate dinner. Casual atmosphere as you can see. Hot dogs, several types of sausage grinders are menu’s focus but they also make a fantastic crab cake-super thick and virtually all crab. Hush puppies were great too.

Fantastic friendly service at The Barking Dog

Fantastic friendly service at The Barking Dog. Our waitress was an 11 on a scale of 1 to 10!

Tuesday morning we walked approximately 1/2 mile to a nearby Food Lion. At the checkout the woman ahead of us pegged us for boaters (lugging a cooler bag) and offered us a ride back. She told us of a great dining spot downtown, “next to Goodys” with pizza, tapas and more. She even gave us her name and phone number should we need anything.

After stashing the groceries we head for downtown and well what do you know? we stumble (ya right) upon a doughnut place. If you dinghy up the Hampton River to Hampton Public Piers there’s a place to tie up and walk one block to downtown Hampton. The area is small but has many restaurants, a few gift shops, the Air & Space Museum Hampton History Museum, water access, tour boats and a restored carousel.

We easily scout out the dounut shop, but alas closed Tuesdays

We easily scout out the donut shop, but alas closed Tuesdays

Intersection of Queen & King

Intersection of Queen & King

We find Goodys and next door is Venture. (hidden behind the trees)  The posted cocktail menu was all we needed to lure us in. Priced to entice with Classic and Crafted Cocktails averaging $7, you can see below these were not eensy teensy drinks.

One size crafted pizzas made with their own dough, sandwiches, salads and seafood; tapas items served starting at 4pm. But what are Tots? Our waitress- phenomenal- plopped down this free sample. Cook potatoes and skins, add just the right amount of seasoning, spread in a jelly roll pan, chill, cut into small squares and fry em up fresh!!  Served with a side of spicy mayo, they were out of this world delicious. Some entrees are served with a side of Tots but you can also order them as an appetizer.

Venture's signature Tots- to die for

Venture’s signature Tots- to die for

Another great spot with a view! Excellent menu and cocktails too!!

Another great spot with a view!

 

This gorgeous restored carousel has a Connecticut connection

This gorgeous restored carousel has a Connecticut connection

 

Reminds me of the carousels at Quassy, Watch Hill and Greenport (especially)

Reminds me of the carousels at Quassy (CT), Watch Hill (RI) and Greenport (NY) (especially)

Each day small boats arrived to be hauled out and placed into rack storage. We had a front row view. The only other transient boat here was the blue sailboat you can see a bit of in the below photo.

Lifting up and into storage building

Lifting up and into storage building

Matthew was due to be at its closest to us sometime Saturday night-ish, and Friday’s weather was pleasant so why not one more trip into town? This time we walked and before ending up at Venture for an early dinner, we popped into the Hampton History Museum for a side of culture.

At this point any of our considered options would have been fine, even Top Rack but we were happy with Sunset as many days in a slip can add up those $$$$ and this place was “B2G1F” and only $1/night for 30amp power (only had 30amp). It’s a smaller boat place lacking nice scenery; even across the water is a huge barge. But the power was great; many places cause our ground fault warning to sound, the wi-fi worked well and we could easily get to downtown,groceries, pharmacies and yes, ok doughnuts!

Thank you to all who checked on us. 🙂   Next up; fun times during and after Matthew.

 

 

Yes Ma’am! Fine creek dining

Sunset off Daufuskie Island, looking toward Savannah

Sunset off Daufuskie Island, looking toward Savannah

We often joke about being in a creek for the night and how that is so budget friendly, because where do you spend money up a creek? Maybe if you need that paddle, but otherwise you stay aboard or take Fido to shore a few times assuming there’s a place to land the dinghy.

Since we have oodles of time to get to Myrtle Beach why not take things slow and see what new adventures can be stirred up? Preferably not of the running aground kind which sure would stir up the muddy bottom!

Hilton Head got the pass-by every trip and we looked at the situation again (marinas, location) and it still came up short. But the island that lies close by is Daufuskie Island and it had what we were looking for. After departing Jekyll Island we next stopped for the night in New TeaKettle Creek and after that was Breakfast Creek; we tried to act appropriately.

A high tide the other boats are easy to see

A high tide the other boats are easy to see

At low tide the boats disappear into the marsh grass

At low tide the boats disappear into the marsh grass

Friday would find us crossing the border (the Savannah River) into South Carolina and happy to have transited through Georgia without mishap. A bunch of other cruising boats who we’d been seeing (and hearing on the VHF) for the past week were feeling pretty good too. Unfortunately when you are 6’ draft boat you need to be darn lucky, use enough tide or have an up-to-date online cruising guide (like you know who).

Immediately after crossing the Savannah River one enters Fields Cut where you must hug or strongly favor the red marker at the southern entrance (the less tide the more hugging) and keep to that side before moving to center. Then when you are about to exit at the north you’d better hug and kiss the green side if you don’t have enough tide help. A 7 to 8 ft tide range is typical in these parts. The daymarks could be moved, but why do that when you can cause excitement and backups when a boat goes aground because they don’t know the special path? So stupid.

We decided to begin our day at 11 am which would allow us to run on one engine and transit Fields Cut at mid-rising tide. Our day would end around 4pm and when we looked for a good anchoring spot (a creek, small river) we found a spot in the New River just off the ICW and across from Daufuskie Landing. A reviewer mentioned taking your dinghy to the great floating docks and enjoying a meal at Marshside Mamas. Well if that wasn’t intriguing!

Shortly after we upped anchor, uh oh a boat had run aground at the north end of Fields Cut. Where the rivers bend and snake around too much, skinny cuts are created to bypass the long loops which allows you to move along north or south in a straighter line. Shoaling is a problem in many of these cuts and the situation has worsened measurably even since 2010. So this fearless monohull attempts to transit the cut on a falling tide. TowBoatUS is called and he has difficulty getting them off- over an hour. The Coast Guard sticks their nose in and several others sneak by on the green side with no problem, but with caution. One boat comes along and we hear this “Are all these boats aground?” No, just lining up to get by.

Marshside Mama’s, in business for 18 years is simply the coolest place with funky décor, mostly outside seating and happy wait staff. Our meals, oysters and drinks (their rum drink is the Marshside, of course) were outstanding and we’d have returned the next night in a heartbeat.

First, some island history

First, some island history

Side Two and some lady jumped into the shot

Side Two and some lady jumped into the shot

Guess you would call this the backside as we approached from the dock

Guess you would call this the backside as we approached from the dock

Oysters Fuskie- excellent. I think the greens are collards

Oysters Fuskie- excellent. I think the greens are collards

The menu board and Jen our waitress

The menu board and Jen our waitress

 

Russ selected the ribs and I had the Shrimp and Grits which was so fresh and deelish.

Our table and one other was on a tiny stage off the ground. A brush fire with ample smoke helped keep bugs away.

 

Biking Jekyll Island, GA

Sandwiched between Cumberland Island to the south and St Simon’s Island to the north, sits Jekyll Island. Former winter cottage site of the wealthy who may have also owned a summer cottage in Newport, Jekyll is a lovely place to explore with over 20miles of fantastic bike paths where the steepest hill might be a 10” climb over a ¼ mile. Flat and perfect for this non-biker chick.

Jekyll has been on our list for years and this year with extra time available we made it happen. From arrival day, Monday 4/21 to the end of Tuesday we biked as much of the 3-mile-long island as we could. The southern section was closed off due to the recent monsoons; flat terrain equals flooding and the south part sits lower than the rest.

The paths take you through marshes, golf courses, along beaches, through and near the Jekyll Island Club, into the historic district, past cemeteries and the only island fast food joint, DQ Grill and Ice Cream.

Jekyll Harbor Marina has a long face dock laying parallel to the ICW; easy docking with competent dockhands even with current and wind. The marina provides free bikes- imagine that! Their wi-fi was excellent; this is becoming a trend at marinas lately as they upgrade their systems.

So let’s tour the island. We’ll begin at the marina, head along the west (ICW/Jekyll Creek) side, around the northern tip, along the east (ocean) side and then we’ll finish up with a few interior stops.

First we get out our trusty map which shows the bike paths, roads, places of interest and dining options.

The marina is to the right of the 3-circle cluster, at the white road where the bridge crosses the creek; we’ll be heading to the left to begin. Bike paths are blue.

A sailboat heads up Jekyll Creek-probably at mid tide or better

A sailboat heads up Jekyll Creek-probably at mid tide or better. Brunswick bridge in background.

 

Jekyll Island Club- no longer members-only exclusive. Inn, resort and fabulous dining. Pool too

Jekyll Island Club- no longer members-only exclusive. Inn, resort and fabulous dining. Pool too

Croquet on the lawn of the Jekyll Island Club

Croquet on the lawn of the Jekyll Island Club

 

Latitude 31 and their outdoor Rah Bar situated next to the creek

Latitude 31 and their outdoor Rah Bar situated next to the creek

The weather was so lovely, warm but not too, and the ambience so perfect that we ate lunch here both days. Monday’s special was one pound of Georgia peel-‘n-eat shrimp with your drink choice. The shrimp was melt-in-your-mouth heavenly; so fresh and cooked to “just done” perfection. Our usual island libation choice is the rum punch and the Rah Bar’s Rum Smash was excellent.

At first glance we thought "swan?", but no, just white pelicans acting like swans

At first glance we thought “swan?”, but no, just white pelicans acting like swans

While all the bike route is clean, wide and well-kept, the sections through the historic district are especially neat and tidy. This photo below is a great example of what we found along the route. Covered trash cans, water fountain, bench and an informational sign. Signs explaining the marshes, birds, small animals, historic sites and such were well placed (and well spaced so you could rest frequently if you wanted).

The perfect spot to rest, read and quench your thirst.

The perfect spot to rest, read and quench your thirst.

 

Red Bug electric carts are available to rent at the Jekyll Island Airport

Red Bug electric carts are available to rent at the Jekyll Island Airport

 

Horton House. Constructed of tabby and the only one of its era remaining

Horton House. Constructed of tabby and the only one of its era remaining

By one of its two fireplaces- can see the exposed tabby

By one of its two fireplaces- can see the exposed tabby

Major William Horton, an officer under General James Oglethorpe, was the first Englishman to purchase land on Jekyll Island. He eventually purchased nearly 500 acres and built the Horton House to serve as a British Empire outpost and his personal residence. Photos showed it with porches and an upper deck.

If I recall correctly, from our museum tour (no photos allowed) this was the second home. His first was burnt by the Spanish (?) about a year after he built it. Think we’re in the 1700’s here.

Driftwood Beach- an extreme and haunting example of serious land erosion

Driftwood Beach- an extreme and haunting example of serious land erosion

Each week the human crew of m/v Acapella, otherwise known as ActiveCaptain, sends out an email that deals with a technical topic, new feature of, or future plans for the best interactive cruising guide we’ve found, ActiveCaptain. The second part of their email is the Defender First deal of the week and the last but not least section is where they mention where they have been and a link to their blog, Talking Paws.

They also, of course, enter reviews in AC about places they’ve stopped at and a recent one was right here at Jekyll Island. A place Karen said not to miss was Driftwood Beach. Not really driftwood, but uprooted trees strewn along the north tip of the island. Another planet for the look and feel of those snarled tree trunks and massive root systems. Some rocky sections and little pools contained shell pieces and a few pieces of sea glass.

driftwood beach

Signpost near Jekyll Island Market and the only photo by the ocean beach

Signpost near Jekyll Island Market and the only photo by the ocean beach

The GA sea turtle center located a short distance from the Pier Rd shops

The GA sea turtle center located a short distance from the Pier Rd shops

The doc was in!  We got to see shell repairs in action up close and personal behind plexiglass. The center was beautiful; well designed and fun to explore.

Two gopher turtles require shell repair after being hit by cars

Two gopher turtles require shell repair after being hit by cars

Baby turtle, Glory has a decent chance of survival

Baby turtle, Glory has a decent chance of survival

The Glory Boardwalk mentioned in the “Meet Glory!” write-up was built specifically to film several Civil War battle scenes in the movie, Glory, filmed on Jekyll Island in 1989. And yes, we’ve added it to our movie list. Because it’s in the southern part of the island we missed it.

Capn' Crunch as seen from the tilted observation mirror above the tank

Capn’ Crunch as seen from the tilted observation mirror above the tank

Did you ever wonder why?.....

Did you ever wonder why?…..

Could not resist a photo of these, but I did resist the urge to buy one

Could not resist a photo of these, but I did resist the urge to buy one

Crossing the island was more rustic- watch for gators here

Crossing the island was more rustic- watch for gators here

Our tour ends back at the marina where this tug and barge come through in daylight. Because the ICW in Jekyll Creek is so narrow, they usually do this at night. Not only is the creek narrow, but in a couple of places,  if you don’t know the “secret path” you could easily run aground.

Tug and barge consume much of the creek as they go past

Tug and barge consume much of the creek as they go past

 

 

Toogoodoo Creek

What a name uh? (An Indian name, but no luck on finding meaning) But it wasn’t Too Good for us looking for real wind protection that night. That morning was free laundry and provisioning at Harris Teeter. I met Denise on s/v Sloop John Dee and we exchanged weather reports. They were docked in front of us at the finger piers; we had a good chuckle at the dinghy name, “One Ringy”.  Get it? Ok, maybe not if you are too young 🙂

Like most creeks in southern South Carolina and Georgia, Toogoodoo is marsh-lined which offers minimal wind protection. Reviews promised a creek wide enough to accommodate swing room, minimal pot floats and if you went up it 2 ½ miles… voila! Tree protection. And that we did. Alone in our creek, exactly as described we settled in and watched another pretty sunset.

My view out the galley window at sunset.

My view out the galley window at sunset.

Although we heard the wind at night, we didn’t quite get the true picture until the trees stopped protecting us and wow- 22kts! From the north so it wasn’t too bad and with much of the trip to Beaufort, SC near high tide we had no depth worries through all the cuts that have become badly shoaled. Perhaps a jump outside is in order.

Eagle Alley

Anchored behind Butler Island in the Waccamaw River approx. 10miles north of Georgetown, SC

Anchored behind Butler Island in the Waccamaw River approx. 10miles north of Georgetown, SC

After leaving Barefoot Marina we spent three days making the 100nm to Charleston and a two-night stay at the Maritime Center. Thanks to continued shoaling, some quite severe along the last 65 mile stretch, we needed to travel certain sections at mid tide or better. No way was a repeat of our Halloween adventures on my dance card and when I glanced at the Captain’s, his looked the same. When the tide range is seven feet you’ve got a lot to work with but some spots, as strongly attested to by ActiveCaptain reviews, had a little as 3 ½ ft at low tide. Now that’s bad. With no funds available, dredging will not be forthcoming.

Much of those last 65 miles takes us through the Cape Romain Wildlife Refuge where, you may recall, my spy-glass gets a workout thanks to the plethora of, well, wildlife. The camera zoom was stretch to its limit more than once.

If you look closely you can see the camera shy eagle below the one on top

If you look closely you can see the camera shy eagle below the one on top

Osprey and eagle share a prime perch

Osprey and eagle share a prime perch

This one strikes a commanding pose at the water,s edge

This one strikes a commanding pose at the water’s edge

Eagle count: 9  Plus osprey, egrets, herons, pelicans and various small birds. No gators this time though.

Monday night before heading in to Charleston on Tuesday was a tad windy and the anchoring is your choice of creeks on either side of the ICW. To the east lies the marshes and ocean, to the west, marshes and mainland. We chose a creek with plenty of swing room on the mainland side and one that was a creek off a creek. Wind do your worst, we are snug near the creek’s edge. No fetch to slam us around. I like it when 25kts feels like 10kts.

Came upon this camper house boat thing on our way to anchoring in Long Creek

Came upon this camper house boat thing on our way to anchoring in Long Creek

More Air in a Hurry

Stay, go, stay …. Go!!  Sunday’s forecast kept us guessing and chicken sailor I am, I was not up for 25kts, even off our stern. But when Sunday arrived and conditions looked favorable for a decent sail much of the day, we took off. Monday was predicted to be a motoring event so we wanted one last good sailing day to complete our Chesapeake expedition. Plus, s/v Spray Cat, an Island Spirit 400 (same as One White Tree), the cat ahead of us coming into Crisfield, was leaving and even we possess a teeny bit of competitive spirit.

The day was a virtual replica of Friday; big wind overnight, moderating in the morning and diminishing down to less than 10kts by early afternoon. We raised the main with one reef and shook it out after 30 minutes. Conditions were so favorable that we felt comfortable using the screecher, but that didn’t last long as the wind diminished too much to keep the large sail filled. At least we got to take a good look at her since the repair work and check that we’d gotten her and those long lines back on correctly. So much for that air in a hurry- in a hurry to leave I’d say.

We did catch up to Spray Cat who’d left at least 30 mins before us. But in their defense, they had a reef in the entire time and looked to be headed toward Deltaville, a closer destination than ours but a better sailing angle.

We passed by Wolf Trap Light near the end of our day

We passed by Wolf Trap Light near the end of our day

Even with our 9am late start we logged 57nm (65 land miles) in 8 ½ hours, arriving in Claxton Creek just past 5:30. Earlier in the day we crossed the state line; farewell Maryland, hello Virginia!

And some of you know what Virginia means- Norfolk! and all those Navy ships, Coast Guard cutters, tugs, barges, pleasure craft, pilot boats, container ships, oh my!   This being our seventh time through here we’ve become a bit blasé about the trip. But just in case others are too, the Naval ships make sure to get your attention.

Naval aircraft carrier #5 announced the ship was preparing to leave the dock and heading out to sea. Our ears prick up when we hear any naval vessel on the airwaves. This announcement is made on CH16 and is a bit lengthy. The gist of it is who they are, where they are headed and what actions other vessels should and should not take. Other vessels need to keep clear by at least 100 yards and if they don’t they will be subject to, “….including arrest and deadly force.” Well, alright-y then. We kept our distance and cut across the channel before #5 arrived.

We stay clear of No. 5 as she heads out of Norfolk

We stay clear of No. 5 as she heads out of Norfolk

We’d seen a steady stream of double-masted sailboats heading up the Chesapeake as we came in to Norfolk. After the first few I figured some weekend event must have taken place and sure enough we learned about the Schooner Fest. Weren’t surprised to see our old friend, The Pride of Baltimore II heading back to her home port. She sure gets around.

Pride of Baltimore II heads home after the schooner fest

Pride of Baltimore II heads home after the schooner fest

We got lucky and snagged the last spot on one of two free docks near the Great Bridge Bridge. Guess who was on the other free dock? Yes- Harmony II!  We may see them yet. Swapped stories and shared ActiveCaptain info with m/v Otter who was docked ahead of us. From our stop last April we knew just where to go; Chili’s for dinner, Panera for breakfast treats, then Farm Fresh supermarket for a couple of bags of food. We are now at Mile 12 on the official AICW; only another 1,000 more to go; less if you convert to nautical miles 🙂

 

Tide erases plans written in sand

Looking across the Sassafras from our anchorage

Looking across the Sassafras from our anchorage

 

Need I say more?  As we peered into the weather or not crystal ball, Monday’s event was to give way to a one day break before a coastal low would sneak in Tuesday evening and hang around long enough to mess up our sail repair plans for St Michaels. Annapolis remained in play and Russ found a great place to anchor near a park with dinghy access.

Once the fog cleared enough on Sunday we bid farewell to the Sassafras and hung a left (that’s south for you precise nautical minded folk) down the Bay, our Baybeard in full display above the waterline. Alas, no sailing as the NE winds couldn’t muster more than 8kts but we had a favorable current (have you noticed our good luck in this regard?)

Our destination today was Bodkin Creek on the opposite (western shore) where we’d have protection from SE to N winds, great cell service (so I can catch up on these posts), no fetch whatsoever and pleasant surroundings. Only one other cruising boat was nearby. For the past two days we’ve been underway with one of the front panels rolled up; an extremely rare occurrence outside of the Bahamas. Thanks to this heat wave and barely breezy we enjoyed the fresh air and an improved view.

We greatly enjoyed happy hour on the bow as the heat wave continued

We greatly enjoyed happy hour on the bow as the heat wave continued

The trip of 32 nm (roughly 37 land miles) took five hours and if we didn’t have to dodge crab pots we might have dozed off J.  The creek is lined with attractive homes most with small docks or lifts for their boats, and plenty of trees to keep that natural look. Monday’s event was, for us, mostly hype and little action- thankfully. Plenty of rain and the temp dropped from 73 to 64 in five minutes. Tornado warnings in the vicinity made my stomach churn but we had only a few gusts to 25; they felt like gentle nudges.