Jeepin’ Around the Block

Every island, no matter the latitude, possess an aura and allure that the mainland can’t quite compete with. Block is no exception; exploration, recreation, entertainment (even in the anchorage), beaches, shopping, food of all kinds- all to tempt you and keep you coming back for more. Over the years we’ve seen quite a bit of the island on foot, bike or taxi and this time I really wanted to get back out to the lighthouses and see more of the island. Block covers approx. 11 sq miles or 7,000 acres (including the Great Salt Pond); roughly half the land is preserved space. It’s easy to forget that Block Island offers more than a shop-filled main street that looks out over the ocean with unobstructed views to the horizon.

Water St in Old Harbor- Surf Hotel in background

Water St in Old Harbor- Surf Hotel in background

Shopping was not on my list and since I was obviously ill :-), Russ agreed to rent a Jeep for our island tour ( I also played the “birthday week” card). – side and rear panels removed. We began by driving up Corn Neck Rd to the North Light.

Hey-Going my way?

Hey-Going my way?

Our route is darkened, black dots show our stops

Our route is darkened, black dots show our stops

North Light: a 1/2 mile walk from the parking lot and not open during the week.

North Light: a 1/2 mile walk from the parking lot and not open during the week.

An event is recorded - for us to wonder and for nature to reclaim one day

An event is recorded – for us to wonder and for nature to reclaim one day

The Sacred Labyrinth

The Sacred Labyrinth

A display of labyrinth-related items including a journal kept in the box

A display of labyrinth-related items including a journal kept in the box on the lower shelf

The sacred labyrinth is made from small stones  and has a beautiful view of the North Light and Sachem Pond. A single winding path leads to the center and back out. Walking the labyrinth is a universal ritual that has remained unchanged for thousands of years. Often believed to heal body and soul; I must agree, as simply being near it cured me of my no-shopping illness.

We skipped The Maze, but later read it is a “must-do”.

We zoomed south past the beaches on Corn Neck Rd, fortified ourselves with a quick outdoor lunch and a T-shirt purchase for Russ ( see? bet he’s glad I got cured), then headed up Spring St toward the Southeast Lighthouse and the breathtaking Mohegan Bluffs.

Looking at Southeast Light from the edge of the bluff

Looking at Southeast Light from the edge of the bluff

A lighthouse on the move; in 1994 it was moved back about 500ft as constant bluff erosion was going to eventually topple this grand structure into the rocky shore below.

Looking down the more than 120 steps to the beach at Mohegan Bluffs

Looking down the more than 120 steps to the beach at Mohegan Bluffs

Just past the lighthouse is access to the beach far below. At one time the steps ended right at the beach but storms destroyed the lowest section and someone must have said, “why bother to replace it, people can use a rope.” I stayed on the landing with the camera and Russ hit the beach for close-ups on the field of cairns piled everywhere. Forget bluffs, this was more like Dune. Free transport to a sci-fi planet.

Russ makes the final descent to the beach

Russ makes the final descent to the beach

 Cairns piled across the beach

Cairns piled across the beach

Russ snaps close-ups with the trusty iPhone

Russ snaps close-ups with the trusty iPhone

Close-up of a tall one

Close-up of a tall one

A balancing cross cairn

A balancing cross cairn

Fresh Pond as seen from Greenway path

Fresh Pond as seen from Greenway path

The island contains several greenways and we walked part of one after “escape from planet cairn”.  As we traipsed along through the narrow swath of path through the fields, I began feeling sleepy, sleepy , oh the poppies, so sleepy.

What, not poppies?

What, not poppies?

and this isn't the wizard?

and this isn’t the wizard?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sign by the seasonal Coast Guard station at the entrance to New Harbor

Sign by the seasonal Coast Guard station at the entrance to New Harbor

One sign that is hardly needed is one pointing to the beach; from anywhere on the island you don’t have to walk far to find a great beach. With enough time you can try them all, each is unique, but none had many shells and even less sea glass.

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A Particular Harbor

Menemsha (the name derives from an old coastal Native American word “Still Water”) is a special place; we’ve always loved it and wished for more time in this fishing harbor a bit more bustling than Cuttyhunk. Menemsha is located up-island on MV’s north side just a few miles from the western tip of the island. It is known for affording fabulous views of beautiful sunsets, lobster and fish markets to satisfy your every New England seafood desire, several shops to tempt you and beaches to sunbathe on or to beachcomb. Four hours was all our drooling, eager selves needed to cover all those bases; with temps in the low 70s we opted for beach combing rather than sun bathing.

One of two seafood markets by the docks in the harbor

One of two seafood markets by the docks in the harbor

If you take my picture I won't buy out the store

If you take my picture I won’t buy out the store

The harbor is postage stamp size with prime dock space for 15 power boats and 2 mooring balls for sailing vessels only (expect rafting). Additional dock space mid-harbor is available for unlucky power boats or ones who’d rather not have their every move and sound witnessed by neighbors and passersby. Larger yachts can dock parallel along the opposite side of that dock. Outside the harbor, just off the beach are additional mooring balls but they’d be a lousy choice if the wind is more than 12kts from any direction other than south. Another option is to anchor off the beach; the holding is very good in coarse sand and you can be in 10ft easily. We anchored of course.  Low wind for the afternoon and night made this the perfect time to visit Menemsha; who knows what the conditions would be when returning from Oak Bluffs farther east.

The essential bike ferry- so you can bike your hearts out across MV

The essential bike ferry- so you can bike your hearts out all across MV

Looking down the long dock toward the harbor entrance

Looking down the long dock toward the harbor entrance

After assisting Menemsha Blues with their end-of-summer sale and acquiring lobsters to steam aboard as well as a dozen local oysters to shuck we headed over to the beach. Happy me that the sea glass fairy (we are near Gay Head after all!) dropped a few teeny trinkets on her way to some other place; one of them a pea-sized piece of red sea glass.  Red is rare and this is my only piece.

Russ wanted to explore further up into Menemsha’s harbor and check out the decaying remains of Orca, the shark fighting vessel of Jaws fame. Orca was showing her age and neglect back in 2007 when we last stopped at Menemsha on Island Bound, our 320 SeaRay. After the movie was filmed she was brought to the harbor to rest on her laurels and whatever other parts, on the sandy flat long the harbor’s edge. Russ did not have any photo taking device with him I am sorry to say. While he was away I updated the blog and our “where-is” Google map.  I did not notice the large yacht until Russ shouted from the dinghy, “who’s the yacht?” Well, let’s check. I go to the chart plotter, touch the green AIS triangle and up pops this screen of info.

Who owns this? Let's just say that tonight Menemsha is Margaritaville

Who owns this? Let’s just say that tonight Menemsha is Margaritaville

Wide-eyed, we both realize at the same moment, just who owns that (cornflower) blue-hulled yacht. Happy hour and oysters can wait; we need to find out if he might actually be aboard. Umm, let’s see. Done with US concert tour, not heading to Paris until Sept 26. Yep, could be chillin’ out in this particular harbor. No guarantees because the yacht can be chartered, but still quite likely and this is second-home territory.  The 32’ center console tender zoomed in and back out to the mother ship. We watched expectantly as the yacht made her way into the harbor.

Continental Drifter heads for the breakwater entrance to Menemsha

Continental Drifter heads for the breakwater entrance to Menemsha

Oh ya, she’s going to tie up alongside the dock and we’ll dinghy in for some close-ups.

Continental Drifter III prepares to dock

Continental Drifter III prepares to dock

For some reason, the fenders had not been placed on the correct side and had to be laboriously moved to the yacht’s port side before she could snug up to the dock. Several onlookers stood by on the dock while others at the “prime” docks across the way stood on their bows, some with visual aids.

Hey big fender-won't you come on over?

Hey big fender-won’t you come on over?

Just think, Buffet and crew are here most likely for much the same reasons we are. To taste the saltiness of Menemsha and enjoy lobster, oysters and sunsets. For us just one night; the September winds would be present again for a couple of days so we’d kick it up a notch and head for more vibe in Oak Bluffs.

Block Watch

Phew- we did it all; a nostalgic week-long cruise visiting favorite places in eastern Long Island Sound. The week-long trip was a mix of motoring and motor-sailing due to generally low wind. The good part of that is one can be almost anywhere with few worries; and right about now that sounded really good to us.

First up, Block Island.

Block Island in August you say?  Crazy you might think. Uh, right you’d be.

Entering the bustling New Harbor on Block Island

Entering the bustling New Harbor on Block Island

No worries mon.  We found a corner to anchor in; only 16 ft of depth (compared to 20ft-plus elsewhere) where we enjoyed a “generous” 2 to 3 boat lengths between us and our new neighbors. Our closest neighbor came by to warn us that if our stern swung out across the imaginary anchoring boundary line, we could be asked to move. The backup plan was to request a private mooring assignment at 3pm. Several year ago this practice was established and it greatly improves the super summer congestion in Block’s New Harbor. This was looking more likely by the minute when a 30’ SeaRay anchored over our anchor at 2:30. Yes, they planned on leaving at 3pm for a private mooring assignment and we’d be right behind them.

Live entertainment in Old Harbor- note the man on his boat with musical eccoutrements

Live entertainment in Old Harbor- note the man standing on his boat with musical accoutrements

Block was a bit too busy for us and once we had those Killer Donuts in hand we decided to move on to Watch Hill and anchor off Napatree Beach. The downside to the private mooring assignment is that you have to be off by 10am. This was the kind of beautiful summer week where no one in their right mind was about to vacate a town mooring. Ortolan fell in behind the long line of mostly monos heading out after the morning rain cleared.

An easy three-hour motor found us anchored behind Napatree Beach at Watch Hill. No, Taylor Swift was not home but she sure had quite the crew watching her gorgeous five acres on the point overlooking the Sound. Her recent purchase of a house in Watch Hill at $17mil makes this the most expensive home sale in Rhode Island. A stone’s throw from the completely renovated Ocean House, the area oozes wealth in an understated New England manner; classy and sublime.

Garden with creative natural fencing on the way out to the lighthouse

Garden with creative natural fencing on our walk out to the lighthouse

Flying horses carousel

Flying horses carousel

The unique flying horses merry-go-round

The unique flying horses merry-go-round

The completely restored Long Island commuter yacht, Aphrodite rested snug against Watch Hill Docks, every bit as gorgeous as the photos in some boating/yachting mag we no longer subscribe to depicted a few years ago. Aphrodite is owned by the same person who owns Ocean House and for $1,000 or more a night you too can bask in luxury accommodations and enjoy a visit to Stonington on Aphrodite.

Tuesday’s fog and all day rain provided me an opportunity to pursue my sea glass jewelry making hobby. Baby steps- more like crawling though. I’ve practiced wire wrapping and was ready to move on to drilling. Russ had a Dremel and the smaller 3/32” collet required by the tiny drill bits. You thought Twiggy was skinny, look at this drill bit.

A successful drilling of two pieces, sans drill press.

A successful drilling of two pieces, sans drill press.

It did the job though; Russ drilled the first one and I managed the second. Diamond tipped bits, these are good quality and should last 40-50 drillings; works for me.

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A brief return

When you get bit and it makes you itch, you scratch it. We’d caught the local waters cruising bug; back at home base for a few days then we’d head out again based on promises made by our friendly weather service. The second Saturday in August is the date of the annual Bradburn family luau; this year was number 21. Martin swore it was 23; his mom said 21. Guess who ate crow?

Lola's has THE best drink descriptions anywhere and drinks are fantastic too!

Lola’s has THE best drink descriptions anywhere and the drinks are fantastic too!

 

After our shorter than usual luau stay the next stop brought Bonny to our friend Cathy’s in Groton. Who is this Bonny you wonder?  Our Mini Cooper’s name is Bonny. Two reasons; one, she was bought around Easter time (think Easter bonnet) and two, she came from across the ocean (think “my Bonny lies over the ocean”.) Not to mention that the English call a car’s hood, a bonnet. Soooooooo, anyway, we enjoy being in Cathy’s condo almost as much as she likes visiting us in the Bahamas in winter. On this particular visit her cat, Snickers, kept us amused with her feline “you can look and I will jump on you but don’t touch me” attitude.

Saturday’s weather was lovely summer sunny-ness. Many boats bid farewell to their slips starting Friday and by the time we tossed off those dual pennants early Sunday morning, the marina was looking a bit empty. As it should-at least once a season.

Land Tours

Life on a mooring… is a ball! Just a bit of nautical humor to kick things off. 🙂  Two Vermont jaunts- overnights of the road trip kind, followed just recently by day trips to Mystic and New Haven (not to Pepe’s- gasp) have kept us on the go. Vermont, I’m compelled to admit, is rolling hills, vacation-perfect, clean air lovely. If only Vermont was south of CT, it would be 100% darn near perfect! Still, we visit ones we love no matter where they are. Three nights off the boat; the longest since we began this crazy cruising life. Our early May trip to Poultney for Lily’s graduation and a much-anticipated visit with Benj before he headed to Montpelier for his Summer of Sheep and Yurt Living, was peppered with rain threats and much dining out. GMC traditionally holds commencement on Mother’s day weekend enabling me to spend Mother’s Day morning with my son for the first time in several years. The college must have an ‘in’ with the weather gods as commencement is held outside with a move inside only in the most dire of circumstances.

Procession up Main St

Procession up Main St

Happy grad Lily and Benj

Happy grad Lily and Benj

The rain held off for the exercise and post-photo taking- a true testament to prayer and fabulous luck. Our après graduation meal with the Bradburns was enjoyed at the Bluebird Diner in nearby Castleton. Breakfast fare for some, lunch for others; excellent diner food and service. Love it.  Root’s, just down the road from Table 24 in Rutland, was the scene for a tasty dinner; no shortage of farm-to-table and creative dining options in Rutland.

Fast forward three weeks as we drive up to Montpelier for a Sheep and Son visit. To protect the privacy of the owners I won’t mention names or other specifics, but no matter where this slice of heaven exists, it is beautiful. Downtown Montpelier, is quaint and like Rutland, has no shortage of great dining. With a co-op, Laundromat and library all within a couple of blocks a trip into town is easily productive. My photos here pale in comparison to many of the ones Benj posted on FB; must be the connection he has with the animals, cuz lord knows I have none!

Home sweet yurt at the edge of the trees

Home sweet yurt at the edge of the trees

Baahh, don't take my picture I'm eating

Baahh, don’t take my picture I’m eating

An egg hunt- those hens can be sneaky

The daily egg hunt- those hens can be sneaky

A day trip to Mystic is a must-do for us, at least several times over the summer. Under the guise of a walking trip, we strolled around town, checked out the new upper deck of the Oyster Club (we’ll be back), enjoyed outdoor lunch at S&P Oyster House, got a close-up look at the scaffold laden Charles W Morgan and nearly cried to discover the beading shop had closed down. Well, we’ll find others.

View from new Treehouse at the Oyster Club

View from new Treehouse at the Oyster Club

The Morgan is due to launch July 4- a 5 yr restoration

The Morgan is due to launch July 4- a 5 yr restoration

Our trip into New Haven was prompted by Cathy, my CT social secretary, who found this great walking tour by Taste of New Haven, Food and Drink Tours. She found it on TravelZoo.com. Never heard of it? Me neither. Check it out though. This tour was delightful and Eric, our guide, was engaging, knowledgeable and enthusiastic. This particular tour was the Canal Tour which began at the site of the canal that long ago was used to transport goods between New Haven and Hartford. Fourteen of us, including Russ, I, Cathy and John (PJ) covered less than two miles in a few blocks to the east of the Green between Trumbull and Elm Streets. The tour consisted of eight stops, each with food and/or drink, facts about the area and as much Q&A as you wanted.

Tasty treats at Katalina's Kupcakes

Tasty treats at Katalina’s Kupcakes

Eric is an architect. He shared oodles of interesting info about many of the buildings we walked past and stopped at. The old New Haven Arena- site of the first hockey game I ever saw (age 10?) is now a FBI building. We enjoyed ourselves immensely and partook of excellent food and libations; more than enough to fill you up.

Eric addresses us at Caseus- fromagerie and bistro (sorry-iPhone fuzzy pic)

Eric addresses us at Caseus- fromagerie and bistro (sorry-iPhone fuzzy pic)

I grew up in Hamden, New Haven’s cousin to the north and spent plenty of time in the no longer existent Macy’s and Malley’s,  took clarinet lessons in a building years ago demolished, and with Mom picked up my Dad from work at Olin on Fridays, just a few blocks away from Winchester Repeating Arms location. Since then, except for an occasional dinner trip in, a jazz fest or two, or to the courthouse for jury duty (a federal case), I’ve see little of downtown New Haven. This walking tour convinced me that gems, hidden and not, abound in the areas surrounding the New Haven Green. Not only would I (we?) return to all of these again (but that’s the idea right?) but several would satisfy our son’s desire for healthy foods and a cozy neighborhood feel; ideally owner-operated. Our next trip in for Pepe’s fantastic pizza may require a side trip. Soon.

Dungeness: Cumberland Island, GA

Cape Cod National Seashore. Cumberland Island National Seashore. If you’re lucky enough to have visited one, let alone both, you are lucky indeed. Dungeness is not one, but two magnificent estates, each separated by 100 years and sharing the same name. Just to keep things interesting.

First off a brief (Oh, when am I ever brief?) history and for those craving more, you can Google “Dungeness” or “Cumberland Island.” The Timucuan Indians, same ones Ponce de Leon came upon in Florida, were Cumberland Islands’ earliest inhabitants.  For over 3000 years they thrived on the bounty of the land, sea and shore. The 1500s brought the first Europeans to Cumberland Island, namely the Spanish, who, true to form, established a mission.

In 1736, the English, led by General Oglethorpe, took possession and constructed two small forts at each end of the island.  Due to the island’s location between England’s and Spain’s territories, not much happened in the way of homesteading or cultivating even after land grants became available in 1760’s.

After the Revolutionary War, General Nathanael Greene acquired property on the island which he primarily used for harvesting live oak for use by the U.S. Navy. He died and his wife Catherine remarried. She and new hubby, Phineas Miller, built a four-story tabby mansion (Tabby is a type of concrete made by burning oyster shells to create lime, then mixing it with a slurry of water, local sand and broken oyster shells. Its origin is uncertain. It is likely that Sixteenth-century Spanish explorers first brought tabby (which appears as “tabee”, “tapis”, “tappy” and “tapia” in early documents) to the coasts of what would become South Carolina and Georgia. Tapia is Spanish for “mud wall”, and, in fact, the mortar used to caulk the earliest cabins in this area was a mixture of mud and Spanish Moss.) (thanks Wikipedia) and named it Dungeness. Upon Catherine’s death in 1814, her daughter Louisa Green Shaw became mistress and promoter of prosperity at Dungeness.

Hundreds of slaves worked the plantations and Sea Island cotton became an important source of income for Dungeness as well as other Cumberland plantations.  Louisa’s efforts saw that other crops such as olives, oranges, figs and pomegranates were grown at Dungeness.

The below house is all that remains of this first Dungeness estate. It is believed to be the oldest structure on the island.  When the Carnegies built their Dungeness, all the original buildings were torn down except this one which was remodeled and used as a business office.

Oldest structure on Cumberland Island, c1800

Oldest structure on Cumberland Island, c 1800

The Dungeness ruins one can see today are those that remain from the Newport mansion-esque estate of Thomas and Lucy Carnegie. Thomas was the younger brother of financier Andrew Carnegie. For some reason he and Lucy visited Cumberland Island and at Lucy’s insistence, soon purchased 4,000 acres in 1882.  The estate would be a fabulous playground for the couple’s nine children as well as friends and family in the elite circle of the Guilded Age.  Thomas died in 1886 (age 44) and Lucy oversaw the creation of a Carnegie Dungeness, complete with the eventual acquisition of 90 percent of the island and the construction of four additional mansions for their children.

This place had it all: recreation building with indoor pool, billiard room, squash court, beauty parlor and sunlit guest rooms; greenhouse; carriage house; servants’ quarters; machine and carpentry shops; commissary and a smoke house. Gardens were designed, planted and tended while crops were grown and harvested. Lucy wanted Dungeness to be self-sufficient and it was. But all things reach the end of their usefulness and the 1920’s saw a decline in the use of Dungeness. Imagine the cost, even then, to maintain such a large remote estate.  Long unoccupied, except for the infrequent visit, Mother Nature had begun to encroach on the buildings and they were in sad shape. In 1959 Dungeness burned.

Mansion house at Dungeness

Mansion house at Dungeness

The story of how Dungeness and all of Cumberland Island came to be protected and preserved by the National Park Service is best left for those who really need to know. Suffice to say that the circuitous route happily led to the treasure we can all enjoy today. Greyfield, one of the four offspring mansions, still stands today and serves both as an inn and a meeting/gathering place for the 12 remaining families on the island. Plum Orchard, further north, also survived and is a museum with odd hours. We stopped there fall 2011 but the mansion was not open that day.

Approximately 120 wild horses roam the island; this count is down from the last time. The horses are descendents of those brought over by the Carnegies and seem to be relatively unperturbed by curious visitors.

The only horses we saw were near the mansion

The only horses we saw were near the mansion

Ferries from St Mary’s bring in boat loads of people every day. Most tour the ruins on foot, but bikes can be rented near the Sea Camp dock. Near the beach, straight across the island from the Sea Camp dock are high-demand camp sites. You bring it all in, you bring it all out.

We anchored off the Sea Camp Dock, second row of boats in toward the “visible at low tide” mud flats. Monday was a gift- the weather was perfect and we got going early so as to see and do as much as possible. Seems we weren’t going early enough, because we missed a submarine leaving from Kings Bay sub base just a couple of miles away.

First stop was the station at the Sea Camp landing to obtain a River Trail guide map and a Dungeness Ruins trail map. The River Trail is an easy mile walk from the Sea Camp dock down to the Dungeness dock. Ten markers identify plants and trees that provided many of life’s basic necessities to the Timucuans.

River trail and horse evidence- which we saw everywhere- all day. Caution advised!

River trail and horse evidence- which we saw everywhere- all day. Caution advised!

The trail brings you to the Ice House. You can guess its original use. Today it houses Dungeness artifacts and photographs along with views into a rich and varied island history.

Thomas and Lucy Carnegie with Dungeness items

Thomas and Lucy Carnegie with Dungeness photographs and tablesetting

The entrance gate is impressive and we listened in while a tour guide told that the iron work was designed by Tiffany, who also came on-site to oversee its installation.

Entrance gates with Tiffany-designed iron work

Entrance gates with Tiffany-designed iron work

How can these be so rusted and still have shiny white walls?

How can these be so rusted and still have shiny white walls?

When we got back to the dinghy dock a surprise was waiting; that darn tide, all six feet of it, had gone down and the outboard was in the mud.

Low tide at the Sea Camp Dock area

Low tide at the Sea Camp Dock area

However, we really felt like idiots when we saw Ortolan stern-to the mud shoal; the wind had shifted and we’d swung toward it rather than parallel.  Depth was 12’ when we’d anchored on Sunday at mid-tide. And we were fine- hey two other cats had anchored in line ahead of us, but guess who had more scope out? Pulled in much of the chain and since no wind was forecast we decided to be lazy and stay put. Still had a few things to do ashore and re-anchoring would cut into that time.

Way too close; the rudders are nudged into the mud

Way too close; the rudders are nudged into the mud

The beachcomber is happy!

The beachcomber is happy!

Many, many dead eagle rays recently washed up: cause TBD

Many, many dead eagle rays recently washed up: cause TBD. Not so happy.

At the end of the day a video was shown about the history of Dungeness and Cumberland Island’s journey to designated a National Seashore.  Glad we finally got here and hope we can return again. I took so many pictures that at some point I’ll create a photo album for Cumberland Island.

Ortolan crew does Norfolk

Each time we pass through Norfolk (to the NE) and Portsmouth (across the river to the SW) we say, “one of these trips we’ll check out Norfolk.”  Finally, this was the year. The Nauticus Museum was a wonderful and well laid out way to learn about Norfolk’s naval and maritime heritage, from tugs and tankers to battleships and destroyers. The battleship Wisconsin is berthed next door and is truly an imposing sight. One of the most useful items in the museum was a Detecto scale; the kind you’d find in your MD’s office. How could I resist?  Hadn’t weighed myself in nearly a year; can you imagine!!?

Bow on shot of Wisconsin, Nauticus Museum is to the left

Town Pointe Park is next to the Nauticus with a view of the river front. This weekend was a big wine festival and as we walked through it during setup it was clear many, many people would be shelling out big bucks for a reserved table, not to mention general admission. The southern end of the park invites you to sit and relax on cushioned rattan chairs… or play a game of Killer Bean Bag Toss. Russ dared to challenge the Queen of Skeeball and lost miserably.

Killer Bean Bag Toss Queen lounges after the big win

Waterside Marketplace, where several chains call home, sits a few feet up from Waterside Marina, where for $3 you can leave your dinghy all day with no worries- and dump your trash. Joe’s Crab Shack brought us back for tasty libations, many served in 16 oz canning jars which you can take home with you. The shark from the Shark Bite is also yours to take.

Joe’s Crab Shack at Waterside with mermaid sentry

Mermaids floated in every direction, one after the other they popped up; by Nauticus, the Marketplace, the marina, in town; you name it. They seem to be primarily the work of one artist, commissioned by others- each with cute mermaid sentiments.

Princess Azalea welcomes you to the Nauticus Museum

When we approached the marina dock ‘lo and behold there sat a boat we knew in the slip a few feet away. Ah, no more could I lament not knowing any of the many boats we’d seen pass through. Side by Side, an Endeavor power cat whose owners Tony and Bente we’d met last fall, most recently on display at the Annapolis power boat show, we’d last seen at Green Turtle Cay.  We chatted and they extended an invite to join them for a movie, preceded by dinner at Outback.  Argo was playing in Aud 12 and we all agreed it lived up to the intriguing previews.

Once again I was grateful for the nice weather which made walking around very pleasant and the dinghy ride out to the anchorage, very easy and dry!  I commented that no doubt we’d be paying a price for the great weather.  Seems whenever we are in NC, the big winds come to play.