Well Rounded and Broad

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Pemaquid Point lighthouse as we rounded the point

Pemaquid Point lighthouse as we rounded the point

What’s round and broad with a hog in between? Our last stops and adventures in Maine. Round Pond, where we’d looked out upon the boats from shore over four years ago, was the perfect spot to spend a couple of nights. Padebco Custom Boat Co offers moorings and we got one with enough swing room. The snug harbor is protected every which way except east with room for pleasure and lobster boats alike. As you might guess Round Pond started out as a working harbor; in the 1800s residents quarried granite and hosted pirates like Captain Kidd. Even Joshua Slocum stopped here in his Spray during his round-the-world trip.
A few miles before Round Pond sits New Harbor (also located on Pemaquid Neck’s eastern shore) where Shaw’s Fish and Lobster Wharf offers an outside deck and bar as well inside dining. We’d heard that several scenes from 1998’s Message in a Bottle were filmed here. The harbor is narrow and laden with pot floats and moored boats so we only stuck our noses in far enough to take a few pictures.

New Harbor on Pemaquid's eastern side

New Harbor on Pemaquid’s eastern side

Bob, the 84-year-old captain of s/v Vintage, required some assistance when a seldom used troublesome sail refused to be furled in.

Thursday we moved north up Muscongus Sound all of 3nm to anchor in Greenland Cove which happened to contain precious few pots and moored boats; we had a huge space all to ourselves in 11-20ft. Hog Island which lies across the narrow channel to the east of the cove’s entrance was our afternoon destination. The entire island (2 miles long) is a preserve and the site of an Audubon Society center for education. We walked several trails (footpaths really) that led us down the island’s eastern shore, crossed over to the west shore and back up and over to our starting point at the north end.
We came upon huge wigwams built over the trail in a few places. ??????????The woodlands changed in composition every few hundred yards but pines, dead, tall and new ruled the island. The island contains one of the oldest forests in Maine as it hasn’t been touched in over 150 years.????????????????????????????????????
????????????????????Our final stop on this one way trip is Broad Cove Marine in Bremen, Maine. I breathed a huge sigh of relief; not one lobster pot was snagged this entire trip. Whew! We knew the worst area would be right at the finish line and while the coverage didn’t appear quite as extensive as in June 2010, this last stretch of just a couple of miles was a mega lobstering zone.pot floats

Looking out away from the marina toward Oar Island

Looking out away from the marina toward Oar Island

A mostly working marina, Broad Cove also offers dockage and moorings to pleasure craft, fuel, a teeny, tiny grocery and the requisite fresh lobsters and a small snack bar with oysters, crab, lobster 5 different ways and sides. What more could we want for the next five days? Maybe laundry ? Careful what you wish for right?  In this case, a decent front loader and two dryers; whodathunk?

Fog rolled in for a  two-day visit and we just went about our business as did all the lobstermen.??????????????????

The nearby island residents use the marina as their base for coming and going which is good business for Broad Cove and how convenient to pick up a few fresh-caught lobsters on the way.

A lobster boat arrives with the day's haul.

A lobster boat arrives with the day’s haul.

Packing and cleaning consumed a ton of time and every single bag, box and container was placed into service. Maine Cat would be coming soon after our departure to fetch Ms Ortolan for her spa treatment-which every woman deserves no matter what her skin is made of.

Do you think Ortolan is maybe just a wee bit lighter? A new waterline not seen in years :-)

Do you think Ortolan is maybe just a wee bit lighter? A new waterline not seen in years :-)

A few phone calls assured us our U-Haul would be available and all we had to do was get it and so a taxi was scheduled. Sun filled the skies; could you imagine us making 12 trips in, the dinghy filled with stuff, then lugging it in a cart up the ramp and through the parking lot in the rain?? I shudder to think of it.

So much stuff!! Kayak and isotherm for sale- and we'll stuff a bus with the rest!

So much stuff!! Kayak and isotherm for sale- and we’ll stuff a bus with the rest!

So long, farewell our home for four years. No more trying to sail on yesterday’s wind; the wind has shifted and well, it darn sure better be a kinder, gentler wind from now on!

Our adventures are not over; there’s a whole country waiting to be explored, donut shops to be discovered, trails to hike, scenery to ooh and aah over, people to meet and the list goes on…..have you seen Robin Williams in the movie “RV”?  :-)

Pemaquid Rocks

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Finally! A seal photo - taken between Boothbay and Pemaquid

Finally! A seal photo – taken between Boothbay and Pemaquid

No offense Plymouth, but Pemaquid has the real deal. Pemaquid was the site of early Native American settlements and the name means “point of land.” We visited Fort William Henry, a Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Site tucked into the western shore of Pemaquid Neck (Maine has many “necks”, those being what I call the long fingers that reach out from the coast into the ocean or a large bay).
M/Y Rena (destination: Somewhere Sunny) was anchored off the fort and we could have done the same but opted for a more scenic and protected spot across John’s Bay behind Witch’s Island.

Notice how the boat's colors mirror the landscape?

Notice how the boat’s colors mirror the landscape?

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The site features a museum/visitor center, the partially reconstructed Fort William Henry, Fort House, village, Burying Ground, boat ramp and pier. The site has an amazing long and varied history and is the last of many forts we’ve visited by boat. One of the brochures is a detailed time line of events starting at 1605 with the capturing of five Native Americans and ending with a planned village excavation in 2009 (Looks like that was done).
Here’s a few dates of interest.
1614-John Smith explored and mapped the Pemaquid area 1621- Samoset, a Native from the Pemaquid area, welcomed the Pilgrims at Plymouth Plantation 1622 – area fishermen gave the Pilgrims supplies 1625-ish- a permanent, year-round, English settlement was established at Pemaquid 1677 – Fort Charles was built and the settlement named Jamestown was reestablished having been destroyed a year prior 1689- Fort Charles and the settlement destroyed – again by Native Americans 1692 – Fort William Henry built to prevent France from expanding its territories southward (we had to remind ourselves just how close to the Canadian border we are) 1696- Fort William Henry destroyed by a French and Indian force 1729 – Fort Frederick built on the ruins and a new settlement established
By 1775 the fort was decommissioned (1759) and smartly the town of Bristol voted to dismantle it. You perhaps can guess, this being 1775 and who would want the British to occupy the fort? Not again that’s for sure.
The Fort House was built in the 1790s and a farm established. DSC00324Beginning in 1869 efforts were made to excavate the site, inventory the gravestones and promote historical Pemaquid. Finally in 1993, Colonial Pemaquid was dedicated as a National Historic Landmark.  DSC00342At some point after the first fort, the huge rock was subsequently enclosed within the walls of the next fort, taking away the “boost up” invaders would use to gain entry. This photo does not do it justice.

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Now, did you know any of that? Why is Pemaquid a sorry second cousin to Plymouth? Geography and lack of shops, eateries, parking and all that good stuff that draws in visitors.
The tiny rocky beach offered up a handful of sea glass. One of the displays at the museum showed old pottery pieces and one looked exactly like pieces I’d found at Burnt Island, but still jagged, the ocean and rocks not yet having worked their magic.

I found several pieces just like the one on the left (front)

I found several pieces just like the one on the left (front)

 

Boothbay Harbor Hanging Out

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Looking further in the harbor toward all the touristy stuff

Looking further in the harbor toward all the touristy stuff

Boothbay Harbor was home port from Wed 8/20 until 9am Monday morning and we thoroughly enjoyed every minute. Well, maybe not the few seconds when the osprey landed on our Garmin wind indicator (visions of three years ago), unintentionally pulling it off.

Bad osprey

Bad osprey

The thing landed with a smack and I jumped, not knowing the osprey was up there. Seems like the local couple has a new family and they’ve been out and about, chattering like crazy and landing on high perches, looking for their next meal.
We’d run out of fruit, so before scurvy could claim us we high-tailed it about a mile to the local Hannaford’s where we just happened to notice they sell not only beer and wine but hard liquor too. Ummm, doesn’t rum count as a fruit? Ships, pirates, rum and all that.
We anchored off Mill Point in 35ft at high water with a 9 ft tide range. I think we managed to put out approx. 4:1 scope which was sufficient for the low winds we were blessed with. Don’t think we ever saw more than 11kts and only briefly. Nice.

A pretty lady sails by

A pretty lady sails by

How great then to zoom down a mile to Burnt Island via Ms Bunting to check out the lighthouse and sea glass laden beaches.

Lighthouse on Burnt Island

Lighthouse on Burnt Island

Many moons ago Algonquin tribes burned the island’s forest to allow them to farm and raise sheep, protected from wildlife on the mainland which sits close enough to row to.Burnt island
Boothbay Harbor welcomes local and far off visitors in abundance but this seems to be on the downside of the tourist season so we never had trouble doing anything we wanted. The harbor is active, with pleasure boats, lobster boats, tour boats, sailing schooners all happily sharing space. We watched them come and go. We never had more than 3 boats total anchored off the point which sits about ¼ mile from the town dock. The tour boat Novelty would stop around 5pm to pick up one of two pot floats they have to show the curious customers how it all works and they always had one lobster for show and tell. Sure, why not have a lobster pot in the middle of the anchorage just to add to the fun?lobster demo
The slippery harbor seals proved elusive still but I kept an eye out and one hand on the camera just in case.
We began some “getting ready to leave her” tasks but mostly tried to ignore the fact that within two weeks we’d be moving off Ortolan, our full-time home since Oct 2010.
Our second iPhone5 cord had crapped out. This one was an aftermarket cord (from the store that shall not be named) but the name brand one didn’t last much longer than a year either; guess we know where the profit center is. Luckily Russ had noticed a RadioShack across the street from Hannaford’s and since I’d forgotten a few important items the first trip, we walked back after a tasty lunch at the Lobster Dock, known for their Bobby Flay’s Throw Down Crab Cakes. Family Dollar sat next door but they didn’t have the cord we needed, so RadioShack was it. At the register I saw the local newspaper looking unusually wide. How long has it been since newspapers were 16” wide? Damn long time and this is one of the last in the country at this size.

Old style wide newspaper- remember those?

Old style wide newspaper- remember those?

The 3D printer caught our eye and I’m still baffled at how a printer- one that you or I could sort of afford- can produce 3D components. The whistle has the tiny ball inside- all made as one component. The small white bottle with screw top is made as two but the top screwed on perfectly. Technology moves faster than the speed of light nowadays.3D printer

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Caprese salad- very creative presentation

Caprese salad- very creative presentation

Taking a short break from lobster, we dined at the very popular in-town upstairs Italian restaurant which name escapes me now. Russ proclaimed the lobster ravs the best ever! So much for a break from lobster.

We chose a California wine as a nod to the earthquake that rocked Napa Valley earlier that day. Even better was the fact that the Bridlewood winery was one we’d visited years ago with Jack and Kerry. Not Napa Valley though but close enough.

This really says it all

This really says it all

Mainly Maine: Bopping toward Boothbay Harbor

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WARNING- LONG POST COVERING EIGHT DAYS AND EVEN MORE STOPS

A very crowded anchorage on a beautiful Sunday

A very crowded anchorage on a beautiful Sunday

After our whale sighting we stopped for lunch at Isles of Shoals, a collection of small and smaller islands about five miles off the New Hampshire coast. But history is funny and several of the islands are part of Maine. Gorgeous spot, very crowded on the lovely Sunday afternoon when we stopped and anchored in over 35 ft of water.
York, ME became our first overnight stop in Maine and that was fitting since it was our first stop in June 2010 after collecting Ortolan from Maine Cat. The current runs strong as you enter the harbor but we thought we’d found a spot to anchor off the small beach before the harbor’s entrance. We come up, look and guess what? Too many lobster pots. I’m picking up the VHF to hail the harbormaster about a mooring when he appears, headed our way. Now that’s quick! I yell over, asking about a mooring and he says he’s got one and he will lead us to it! The current is running strong as we wind our way in, barely making 4 ½ kts with two engines. We spot our ball from 2010 and he keeps leading us in and around to the further-in area and we pick up the ball easily.

A portion of York harbor from our inner harbor mooring

A portion of York harbor from our inner harbor mooring

Next stop: Richmond Island 32nm north of York. The lobster boats got an early start; so we did too and caught the outgoing tide. Along the way we spotted porpoises several times then noticed that the aptly named Cape Porpoise lay 12nm north. SW winds blew gently at 4-7 kts and pots were easy to see in the calm water.

Don't try going between a pot float with a toggle float

Don’t try going between a pot float with a toggle float

Note: we were told that 3million lobster pots live in Maine waters, 65,ooo of them in Casco Bay alone. We work very hard at not snagging one for ourselves.

Our guess is this is a pilot whale carcass- it stank - a lot!

Our guess is this is a pilot whale carcass- it stank – a lot!

Richmond Island is owned by the Sprague family since 1913 and they generously allow a teeny bit of respectful camping. Dinghies can land (kayaks too) on the beach and a marked footpath takes you around ¾ of the island’s perimeter. The treed north tip is “owners only.”

Maps placed along the footpath helped you know where you were and which way to turn

Maps placed along the footpath helped you know where you were and which way to turn

 

Along the perimeter path the foliage and view changed constantly

Along the perimeter path the foliage and view changed constantly

The breakwater becomes more visible with the receding tide

The breakwater becomes more visible with the receding tide

Lori finds first piece of Maine sea glass- blue!

Lori finds first piece of Maine sea glass- blue!

We'd been waiting to see the sheep

We’d been waiting to see the sheep

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The mainland is in the background. We had to walk very carefully once we got to the sheep area

The mainland is in the background. We had to walk very carefully once we got to the sheep area

Unusual cairn on the rocks

Unusual cairn on the rocks

Russ found a piece of PVC pipe and we used it to roll Bunting into the water. The dark mass is rocks

Russ found a piece of PVC pipe and we used it to roll Bunting into the water. The dark mass is rock

I still remain shaken by the situation we found ourselves in the following morning, Tuesday Aug 12. To top it off the fog hung fish stew heavy around us. The prior post shows us in a much improved condition, both location-wise and fog-wise. My headset lasted through the critical times but crapped out when we were raising the anchor; I could hear Russ though which was most important.
The wind had picked up to 11-14kts and by the time we left at 10am the Atlantic coastal waters were choppy, requiring full attention to pot watching. Our destination was the boring sounding and looking Sturdivant Island which sat close to the mainland in Casco Bay. We needed to hide out from Wednesday’s rain/wind event and with NOAA forecasting 8-10ft ocean swells, getting as far in as possible seemed like a really good idea. We spotted seals for the first time; at first we thought their faces were dark pot floats, but no, just seals who dive back in the water before the camera can even be turned on.

After anchoring we went over to Falmouth Foreside for lunch and lobsters to steam for dinner

After anchoring we went over to Falmouth Foreside for lunch and lobsters to steam for dinner

Poured buckets! Over 6" of rain in less than 3 hours- more than we've ever had

Poured buckets! Over 6″ of rain in less than 3 hours- more than we’ve ever had

Thurs, the sun shone, the wind behaved and we got a visit from a local who owns a cottage on the island checking to see how we fared. We almost couldn’t leave; the anchor was like a pig in mud, so happy to be there and just coated in the stuff. But leave we did without breaking the anchor chute and motor-sailed four miles to Great Chebeague Island, anchoring a ways off the ferry dock and The Chebeague Island Inn.

The porch and lawn chairs are the perfect place to enjoy an evening libation

The porch and lawn chairs are the perfect place to enjoy an evening libation

Inn sign

We walked a lot on Chebeague, visited the museum that was the former grammar/middle school, walked to a beach, the market, the Inn and finally to Slow Bell Cafe.  Not all in the same trip.  Very friendly people; 9 out of 10 car drivers waved as they went past us.

The old schoolhouse is now a museum with school and island history

The old schoolhouse is now a museum with school and island history

Friday with high hopes for much diminished swells we headed for Jewell Island on the bay’s outer edge. Cocktail Cove is where one anchors and unless you want to be up close and personal with all your neighbors, you visit on a weekday; so we did. Gorgeous Maine island with the rocks you expect to see and depths you don’t care about as landlubbers but as a boater, cringe when time to drop the hook.

Jewell Island's "cocktail cove"- too narrow for my comfort

Jewell Island’s “cocktail cove”- too narrow for my comfort

We anchored in 20-something which actually has become a reasonable depth as the days have progressed. A couple we met on the beach arrived the day before and said it was rollier than all their previous visits over the years.
One review on ActiveCaptain said sea glass could be found in the Punchbowl and from the looks of it I didn’t doubt the claim but we didn’t find very much and still, no red.

The Punch Bowl on Jewell Island's ocean side

The Punch Bowl on Jewell Island’s ocean side

Walked the path toward the southern end which led to WWII structures and a 5 story tower with bunk rooms and artillery. Jewell is lovely, with pine trees, a couple of campsites and fire pits.

A campsite on Jewell overlooks nearly empty "cocktail cove"

A campsite on Jewell overlooks nearly empty “cocktail cove”

After lunch we departed for Dolphin Marina and Restaurant, located in Potts Harbor at the tip of Harpswell Neck.

Dolphin Marina and Restaurant (on left)

Dolphin Marina and Restaurant (on left)

I’d called ahead for a mooring and Chase came out in the launch to not only show us the ball but handed me the pennant. I didn’t need help but that’s how it’s done at this family-owned marina. Chris Saxton is a third generation owner/operator; his grandparents started the business in 1966 and the restaurant is known for good food, a relaxing ambiance and blueberry muffins. The boat moored next to us was from Chester, CT and we learned that the restaurant is so good that they diverted from their trip home just to stop here. That and free laundry- what more could I ask for? How about no lobster pots in the mooring field? The mooring field here is fairly small- I’m just sayin’.

Round one they were so good

Round one they were so good

Dinner was fabulous and we ended up with three huge muffins; two returned with us to become breakfast the next morning. Mimi, Chris’s mom stopped by every table to do a wellness check. Chris had told us earlier that she and his dad had a winter place on Eleuthera not far from Hatchett Bay so we talked with her a bit about that when she stopped by our table.
This is quite the low key important place; for example we learned that Foxy and his family (you know- of BVI Foxy’s) had visited the week before and Chelsea the dockmaster at Dolphin was best friends with Foxy’s daughter! Go figure.
The weather, while still refusing to provide temps above 75, was a least providing low winds, the kind just perfect for worry-free anchoring and easy dinghy trips to far off islands, not to mention calm enough to run the watermaker.

Sat 8/16 looked perfect for a 2nm dinghy ride to Eagle Island, to tour the summer home of Admiral Robert Edwin Peary, leader of the first successful attempt to reach the North Pole April 6, 1909.(excluding you-know-who, Ho Ho). He was the only man to do this without using mechanical or electronic devices.
Peary was born in PA on May 6, 1856 of French and English heritage. When his father died young, his mom returned to Portland, Maine where Peary attended high school. In the early 1870s he came upon Eagle Island on one his many camping trips and fell in love with it; finally buying it in 1877 from the Curtis family of Harpswell.

We approach the dinghy dock. Boy that's a steep ramp up, thanks to nearly low tide

We approach the dinghy dock. Boy that’s a steep ramp up, thanks to nearly low tide

We watched a wonderfully done video about Peary’s life, accomplishments, summer home on Eagle and his family. The island is reachable only by boat and thanks to low tide and high rocks, the ramp up from the dinghy dock was just a wee tad intimidating to someone with height anxiety.

This tells about Eagle Island and Peary's purchase

This tells about Eagle Island and Peary’s purchase

The Peary summer home with circular stone study to left

The Peary summer home with circular stone study to left

The house was built in 1904; Peary was a busy man, advancing quickly to Commander and proving himself a visionary with courage, commitment and a passion for planning. His vision for the “Big House”, as opposed to the “Little Cottage” was this: the rocky bluff was the prow of a great ship heading northeasterly, and he placed his house as the pilot house of the ship would have been located. The original house rested directly on the bare ledge. Once Peary had shown the world incontrovertible proof of his reaching the North Pole, Congress, expressing the thanks of the nation, authorized that Peary be placed on the retired list of the Navy with the rank of Rear Admiral. Whew- now he could finally relax and fix up that summer home. This the home we saw and walked through today.

The study with a view and a partner desk in the middle

The study with a view and a partner desk in the middle

The three-sided fireplace, each side a different kind of stone found on the island, was designed by Peary and built by master masons. The upstairs contains five bedrooms, one with a small stained-glass window in the closet.

The great room with 3-sided fireplace and a player piano

The great room with 3-sided fireplace and a player piano

The island contains a few short trails that lead you past several small flower gardens and the beach by the bow of the house contains sea glass if you look carefully. Lots of blue and amazingly, no brown- yes I am not joking.

Looking north toward Dolphin Marina

Looking north toward Dolphin Marina

By the time we left the wind had picked up a bit but since we were both going in the same direction, it was a pleasant and surprisingly warm ride.
Fried oysters for lunch and lobsters to cook for dinner; both from Erica’s located on the pier nearby; ah life is good and greatly improved since our Richmond Island “experience.”IMG_0339 (800x584)

Erica got a good deal on this CT lobster boat during the LIS lobster die-off- still a puzzlement

Erica got a good deal on this CT lobster boat during the LIS lobster die-off- still a puzzlement

Sunday, we moved all of five miles to the wide and protected Harpswell Harbor, home to only a few pot floats and private moorings. The floats in the river along the way more than made up for it though. We received a shout-out from kayakers who recognized the boat as a Maine Cat. Across the way lay Orrs and Bailey Islands connected by the only cribstone bridge in the world.??????????????????????

 

The cribstone bridge as viewed from the sea glass sandy beach side

The cribstone bridge as viewed from the sea glass sandy beach side

A close-up of the cribbed stones

A close-up of the cribbed stones

The OBYC let us tie up the dinghy on their dock and we walked over the bridge to Morse’s Cribstone Grill for a delicious lunch and superb service from Karen who found out the grocery store’s hours for us so we’d be sure it was open in the afternoon.

Summer squash- just what I needed

Summer squash- just what I needed

The mile-plus walk was leisurely; stopped for locally grown summer squash and found a beach loaded with teeny smoothed pieces of sea glass. You could just plop down, move the coarse sand around and collect as much as 10 pieces in one sitting. The market was more luncheonette than grocery but we did score a dozen eggs; an important ingredient in French toast and lobster scrambled eggs.:-) The lobsters we bought from Morse’s (many restaurants have a separate building from which they sell fresh lobster,etc) may have been our best tasting ones ever. I do believe I’m starting to get used to cruising Maine waters.

Stover Pt is a thin strip of land on the harbor's east side. Good spot to shoot off a decent fireworks display :-)  Orrs Island is in background

Stover Pt is a thin strip of land on the harbor’s east side. Good spot to shoot off a decent fireworks display :-) Orrs Island is in background

Sailed on Monday 12nm to Small Point Harbor, tucking in to a good–sized cove with only two pots to deal with. Hermit Island is mostly campground with easy walking paths and side paths to the first sandy beaches we’ve seen in abundance.

One of 5 or 6 sandy beaches nestled within the rocky shore

One of 5 or 6 sandy beaches nestled within the rocky shore

 

Lobster traps can be found everywhere- on shore, on rafts in the water and on the rocks

Lobster traps can be found everywhere- on shore, on rafts in the water and on the rocks

Tuesday we hoped to snag a mooring ball in the tiny Five Islands Harbor and our noon arrival granted us a ball from the FIYC that has free balls on a first-come-first-served basis.

Entering Five Islands harbor- tight but doable

Entering Five Islands harbor- tight but doable. Mainland on left, islands right, ahead and behind

We looked very large in a harbor with lobster boats, small picnic and runabouts and a few sailboats under 40ft. A gorgeous nugget of Maine loveliness, made even better by the NYTimes acclaimed Five Island Lobster Co. They have two buildings- one for cooked whole lobsters and steamers (red) and the other for fried, burgers, rolls and logo trinkets.

Our mooring happened to be right off the town dock and the Lobster Cos buildings

Our mooring happened to be right off the town dock and the Lobster Cos buildings

Eating well, that we are. Not finding hot lobster rolls, which I prefer and Russ sort-of likes as long as it isn’t a onion-y lobster salad roll, the FILC serves up a cold lobster roll- naked- no mayo, no butter- just delicious perfectly cooked lobster meat in a hotdog roll; toasted if you ask. My veggie burger with L,T,Pickle and cilantro-mayo was excellent. Not a filler burger but the real deal- roasted veggies combined into a delicious pattie- a yummy lunch.??????????????????

I would hate to see the parking lot on a weekend

I would hate to see the parking lot on a weekend

Dinner was an inspired double-sized lobster roll that we ordered to go, separately. Warmed the lobster with a bit of unsalted butter in foil on the grill, toasted the bun and had twice as much lobster as would fit the roll-which meant some left for breakfast.
Wednesday we bopped over (really 4 miles down and 4 miles up the next finger) to Boothbay Harbor- an easy trip with fewer than usual pot floats. The small anchorage is off Mill Point where the depth is 27ft at low and about 36 at normal high tide. No room for 6-7 scope here (or most places in Maine) but with low to no wind, having a 4:1 ratio is not a problem. At low tide we’d only have 5-ish. Stay tuned for more on Boothbay.